NICE Guidelines for Looked-After Children and Young People

Location: UK

Author: The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE)

Summary: 

This guideline covers how organisations, professionals and carers can work together to deliver high quality care, stable placements and nurturing relationships for looked-after children and young people. It aims to help these children and young people reach their full potential and enjoy the same opportunities in life as their peers.

This guideline does not provide detailed information on health promotion, or cover treatments for specific illnesses and conditions.

In May 2015, changes were made to recommendations 3, 5, 12, 36 and 38 to reflect changes to government policy.

Staying put: arrangements for care leavers aged 18 years and above

​Location: England

Author: Department for Education

Year: 2013

Summary:

This guidance sets out the Department for Education, HM Revenue and Customs, and Department for Work and Pensions frameworks that local authorities must be aware of, and take account of, when developing a local ‘staying put’ policy.

Promoting the health and wellbeing of looked-after children

​Location: England

Author: Department for Education, Department of Health and Social Care

Year: 2015

Summary:

This guidance is for:

  • local authorities
  • commissioners of health services for children
  • NHS England
  • designated and named professionals for looked-after children
  • GPs, optometrists, dentists and pharmacists
  • managers and staff of services for care leavers, and personal advisers
  • teachers
  • health visitors, school nurses and any other professional who is involved in the delivery of services and care to looked-after children

It aims to ensure looked-after children have access to any physical or mental health care they may need.

Statutory guidance is issued by law; you must follow it unless there’s a good reason not to.

This document replaces statutory guidance on ‘Promoting the health and wellbeing of looked-after children’ issued in 2009.

Applying corporate parenting principles to looked-after children and care leavers

Location: England

Author: Department for Education

Year: 2018

Summary:

This guidance is for local authorities and their ‘relevant partners’ (as defined in section 10 of the Children Act 2004) and others who contribute to services provided to looked-after children and care leavers.

It is designed to help local authorities consider the kinds of services that may be offered with regard to the corporate parenting principles.

Allowances Report 2019-20 for England

Location: England

Author: The Fostering Network

Year: 2019

Summary:

In the summer of 2019, The Fostering Network conducted a survey of local authorities in England via freedom of information (FOI) requests. The purpose of the survey was monitor whether local authorities who have previously set their allowances below or at the NMA level are meeting the NMAs set by the Department for Education. This report includes the data from fostering services who have set their allowances below or at the NMA level over the past five years, including this year. 58 local authorities met this criterion.

The local authorities were asked the following question:
1) Please could you tell me your 2019-20 weekly foster care allowances for all age bands, NOT including any fee/reward element for foster carers?
In addition, we asked all local authorities in England the details of the allowances given to former foster carers in Staying Put arrangements and the foster care allowance level for 16-18 to make comparisons of any changes post-18. The results from these questions will be published in a separate forthcoming Staying Put report.
Even though FOI requests should be a reliable way of gathering information, we became aware that some of the information that was given to us was not correct. Where we have become aware of inaccuracies we have sought for clarification and used the updated, accurate figures in the tables below rather than the figures obtained via the FOI request. In each of these cases we have sought clarification direct from the local authority. Given the difficulty in sometimes gathering accurate information about foster care, it highlights the need to make clear and publicly available all foster care allowances set by fostering services.

Surveillance and monitoring in residential childcare settings

Location: England

Author: Ofsted

Year: 2019

Summary:

This information is for providers and managers on the use of surveillance, including CCTV, in their residential childcare settings and how Ofsted will evaluate its use.

This guidance relates to the following residential settings in which inspectors will expect that the remit-specific regulations and guidance are being followed:

  • children’s homes
  • residential family centres
  • secure children’s homes

For residential accommodation in schools, inspectors will evaluate the arrangements against the best practice principles set out in this guidance.