Survey of Children’s Social Services and Care Rates in Wales

We really value your commitment to helping us bridge the gap between research, practice, and policy. This is why we are calling on you. If you work in children’s social care, we need your views and opinions on social care practice in Wales.

The survey will take 15 minutes of your time, but your contribution will be invaluable to helping us to understand stark variations in the numbers of children in care between local authorities. Plus, you will be entered into a prize draw with other members in your local authority to win £250 for a children’s charity of your choice.

Your responses will be anonymous and individual local authorities will not be identified in our final report.

Thank you in anticipation, we can’t wait to hear your thoughts to help us make a better future for children in Wales.

#BlackLivesMatter Series Webinar 1: Anti-Racism in Social Work

ABSTRACT

Wayne Reid is a Professional Officer with the British Association of Social Work (BASW) and a widely revered inspirational speaker and campaigner for racial equality.

In this webinar, the first in our #blacklivesmatter series, Wayne will reflect on the #blacklivesmatter movement and the meaning of anti-racism – the belief that all races and ethnic groups are equal and deserving of the same opportunities.

Anti-racism requires action to tackle existing inequality. Wayne will explore how this is relevant to social work, through professional standards, codes of ethics, cultural competence and the underpinning values of social justice.

BIOGRAPHY

Wayne Reid is a Professional Officer & Social Worker for BASW England and lives in Sheffield. Wayne has worked in: private fostering; the Probation Service; youth offending; adult mental health; child protection and with care leavers.

Wayne’s career reflects his dedication to supporting vulnerable members of society, working with diverse professionals from across all sectors to improve service standards and meet holistic needs. His wide-ranging career has enabled him to understand the dynamic contextual factors that affect the strategic planning, implementation and review of effective Social Work services and the direct impact this has on service-users, practitioners and the public.

As a black male Social Worker, Wayne understands some of the challenges that service-users and practitioners from different minority groups can face. From his experience, Wayne believes academic and ‘life education’ are essential to improve an individual’s quality of life and life chances. Wayne adds: “Social Work is a vital multi-faceted international service that: coordinates support for the most vulnerable people in society; assesses and manages risk; addresses problematic behaviours and relationships; champions equality and social justice; optimises service-users’ strengths, promotes human decency and creates meaningful opportunities for social mobility”.

How coronavirus has affected equality and human rights

This report was originally published at www.equalityhumanrights.com

This report summarises evidence that helps us understand the effects of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on different groups in society. It highlights potential long-term risks to equality and human rights covering key issues in the areas of:

  • work
  • poverty
  • education
  • social care
  • justice and personal security

We make targeted recommendations for the UK, Scottish and Welsh Governments to ensure equality and human rights considerations are integrated into the policy response to the pandemic.

This report is part of the ‘Is Britain Fairer?’ report series.

Treatment of children and young people accused of a crime in the justice system

This is an external event hosted by the British Academy.

How should children and young people accused of a crime be treated within the justice system?

This webinar will include a panel discussion focussing on the complex question of to what extent children and young people should be held responsible for their actions. The discussion will take place virtually by Zoom webinar on Tuesday 08 December, 2.00-3.30pm. 

This online event will explore the complex question of to what extent children and young people should be held responsible for their actions within the justice system. The age of criminal responsibility in England & Wales (10 years) is low by international standards, and panellists will discuss the appropriateness or otherwise of this age limit. There will also be a consideration of the Scottish Children’s Hearings System, including how this system compares with that found in England & Wales. A panel discussion will bring together different perspectives to consider the multifaceted relationship between children and young people and the justice system. 

Speakers will include:

  • Professor Claire McDiarmid, Head of School, School of Law, University of Strathclyde 
  • Dr Michelle Donnelly, Lecturer in Law, University of Stirling
  • Dr Harriet Pierpoint, Associate Professor, Centre for Criminology, University of South Wales

This event forms part of the British Academy’s Childhood Policy Programme. The programme was set up to reframe debates around childhood in both the public and policy spaces, and to break down academic, policy and professional silos in order to explore new conceptualisations of children in policymaking. The Academy’s series of childhood provocation papers, written by experts from across the social sciences, humanities and arts accompanies the programme. This event will provide an opportunity to debate and discuss issues surrounding two of these provocation papers – Dr Michelle Donnelly’s  ‘Scottish youth justice and the legacy of Kilbrandon‘ and Dr Harriet Pierpoint’s ‘Age of criminal responsibility’. 

If you have any questions about this event please contact the Childhood programme team at childhood@thebritishacademy.ac.uk. Please do forward this invite to any colleagues who may be interested in attending.

Future Generations Commissioner’s Report

In May, the Future Generations Report 2020 was published. This report analyses the progress of all public bodies, including Welsh Government, in implementing the wellbeing of Future Generations (Wales) Act since it became law in 2015. It reflects on the progress of all public bodies in terms of whether they have embraced the cultural change required by the Act, and considers the progress being made on each of the seven national wellbeing goals.  More than 5,000 people told the Future Generations Commissioner and her office about what kind of place they want to live in, and what kind of place they want to leave for future generations. The report shares a vision for the future of Wales and sets out recommendations for government and public bodies to help achieve this vision.

Through the interactive online version you can navigate a future Welsh city and its surroundings, there’s a joint emergency services hub (decorated by a local artist) and a gym and leisure centre connected to the hospital, next to a community ‘hwb.’ Wellbeing hubs are dotted across the city, suburbs and countryside. Alongside independently run cafes and shops, sustainable consumption and production is promoted via a swap shop and a repair cafe next to a recycling centre.

Trains make several stops to serve much of the community and there are no cars in the centre – instead, multiple bike racks. A forest centre sits next to a transport hub and there are e-cars with charging ports. In a park, neighbours play wheelchair sports and do outdoor yoga and the Wales women’s rugby team train.

The town hall flies the Welsh flag and a Pride flag, culture is to be found everywhere, the Welsh language is used in everyday life, and there is an outdoor debating space to encourage citizen involvement. Elsewhere, wind turbines and ‘green bridges,’ to mitigate the impacts of roads on walkers and cyclists, providing a safe crossing for wildlife, are the norm.  It’s a Wales with kindness and wellbeing at the heart. One that is fit for the needs of the future.

We have been delighted to work with the Office of the Future Generations Commissioner, and other organisations, to create a young person’s version of the Future Generations Report, which is accessible and exciting.
Developed by a diverse group of young people, to translate the report into their voice and creative style of choice, this version of the report aims to engage other young people, explaining why the content of the report is relevant to them and their future, alongside how they can get involved in demanding the Future Wales they need.

Content provided by Young Wales.

Children & Young People’s Participation

This event is being hosted externally by Children in Wales.

The event is a free event and spaces are limited:

Dates: 07/12/2020, 17/12/2020, 05/02/2021 & 11/03/2021
Time: 10:00am – 3:00pm
Virtual: via Zoom

*Not installed Zoom? You can still join via your web browser without installing Zoom

This course will set out the theoretical and legislative framework for children and young people’s participation in Wales and involve techniques that can be used directly with children and young people. The majority of the course will explore the methods that can be used with children and young people on an individual and group bases to include them as widely as possible in decisions that affect their everyday lives. Participants will feel empowered to use practical tools to support children and young people’s participation. The course is fun and involves engaging exercises.

Who should attend?

Practitioners, Managers and Policy Makers from all sectors and all organisations keen to explore how their area of work and how they can maximise the involvement of children and young people in the work of the organisation.

How should children and young people accused of a crime be treated within the justice system?

This is an external event hosted by The British Academy.

Dec 8, 2020 02:00 PM

This webinar will explore the complex question of to what extent children and young people should be held responsible for their actions within the justice system. The age of criminal responsibility in England & Wales (10 years) is low by international standards, and panellists will discuss the appropriateness or otherwise of this age limit. There will also be a consideration of the Scottish Children’s Hearings System, including how this system compares with that found in England & Wales. A panel discussion will bring together different perspectives to consider the multifaceted relationship between children and young people and the justice system.

Speakers will include:

  • Professor Claire McDiarmid, Head of School, School of Law, University of Strathclyde
  • Dr Michelle Donnelly, Lecturer in Law, University of Stirling
  • Dr Kathryn Hampson, Lecturer in Criminology, Aberystwyth University
  • Dr Harriet Pierpoint, Associate Professor, Centre for Criminology, University of South Wales

This event forms part of the British Academy’s Childhood Policy Programme. The programme was set up to reframe debates around childhood in both the public and policy spaces, and to break down academic, policy and professional silos in order to explore new conceptualisations of children in policymaking. The Academy’s series of childhood provocation papers, written by experts from across the social sciences, humanities and arts accompanies the programme. This event will provide an opportunity to debate and discuss issues surrounding two of these provocation papers – Dr Michelle Donnelly’s ‘Scottish youth justice and the legacy of Kilbrandon’ and Dr Harriet Pierpoint’s ‘Age of criminal responsibility’.

If you have any questions about this event please contact the Childhood programme team at childhood@thebritishacademy.ac.uk.

Make Your Mark

Make Your Mark is an opportunity for 11-18 year olds across the UK to have their say and begin their democratic journey by voting on the policies they want to introduce or change.

The issues you vote as the most important will be debated by Members of Youth Parliament. They will campaign to influence the UK Parliament and their local representatives, ensuring that the views of young people are listened to by decision makers.

This is your opportunity to influence decision makers who can make a real difference on the issues that matter to you. Make Your Mark is one of the most important and influential ways young people can take part in a democratic process.

You have until 30th November to cast your vote!

Topics Include:

  • Support our Mental Health
  • Free University
  • Tackle Child Poverty
  • Stop Plastic Pollution
  • Increase Racial Awareness in the Curriculum
  • Take Action on the Climate Emergency
  • Votes at 16
  • Tackle Discrimination and Hate Crime in the UK
  • Include Young People in the Plan for Covid-19 Recovery
  • Protect Human Rights

The Early Childhood Education and Care COVID-19 Impact Study

The research is being carried out by staff at Swansea University, School of Education in conjunction with the national umbrella organisation ‘Children in Wales’.

COVID-19/coronavirus pandemic on Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) provision in the UK.

We are looking for input from people who work in the early years sector (with children aged 0-8) — practitioners, childcare workers, setting managers, and teachers — to tell us about their experiences of working during the pandemic.

We wish to better understand the impact of the changes that have been made, as well as practitioner perceptions of these changes; we focus on the impact of coronavirus on early years provision, practitioners and children. The findings from this research will be used to better inform emerging policy and practice across the four nations of the UK, to better understand and support settings and schools in dealing with current and future events of this kind.

Please click on here to undertake:

https://swanseachhs.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_8cVDs03cCGClsiN

The survey will close on the 4th December

Young person’s Mental Health Toolkit

Welcome to the young person’s mental health toolkit for 11 to 25-year-olds. Here you will find six playlists to direct you to a wide range of online resources to help you through the lockdown and beyond. In each of the playlists you’ll find self-help websites, apps, helplines, and more that are here to support your mental health and well-being.

Visit the Young person’s mental health toolkit at Hwb Wales: Learning and teaching for Wales.

Resources

Coronavirus and your well-being
Crisis
Anxiety
Keeping healthy
Low mood
Loss